Palettes, Monaco and Terminals…

May 28, 2009

After a long time of trying to the Monaco font to play nicely with any terminal under Linux, I recently found a version of the Monaco font for a Linux OS. The regular Monaco True Type font behaves quite differently under a Linux OS and doesn’t quite render properly in terminals(it displays properly in some text editors though). You can get it here.

To make things a little nicer I changed the color palette to use the Tango palette. The Tango pallete is available by default for the more recent versions of gnome-terminal. My OS still uses Gnome 2.16.0 though.

$ gconftool-2 --type string --set /apps/gnome-terminal/profiles/Default/palette "#2E2E34343636:#A4A400000000:#4E4E9A9A0606:\
#8F8F59590202:#20204A4A8787:#5C5C35356666:\
#CECE5C5C0000:#BABABDBDB6B6:#555557575353:\
#CCCC00000000:#7373D2D21616:#EDEDD4D40000:\
#34346565A4A4:#757550507B7B:#F5F579790000:\
#EEEEEEEEECEC"

Here's What the Tango palette kinda looks like on white bakground

Here's What the Tango palette kinda looks like on white bakground

That should give you a nicer palette, do note that if your using a different “profile” in gnome-terminal you will have to change the word Default in the above to your profile name. Eg. If your profile is called black_hacks in gnome-terminal you’ll end up with something like this…

gconftool-2 --type string --set /apps/gnome-terminal/profiles/black_hacks/palette "#2E2E34343636:#A4A400000000:#4E4E9A9A0606:\
#8F8F59590202:#20204A4A8787:#5C5C35356666:\
#CECE5C5C0000:#BABABDBDB6B6:#555557575353:\
#CCCC00000000:#7373D2D21616:#EDEDD4D40000:\
#34346565A4A4:#757550507B7B:#F5F579790000:\
#EEEEEEEEECEC"

For my terminals with a black background I use the below setting for everything else I use the tango palette.

gconftool-2 --type string --set /apps/gnome-terminal/profiles/Default/palette "#000000:#FF6C60:#A8FF60:\
#FFFFCC:#96CBFE:#FF73FE:\
#C6C5FE:#EEEEEE:#000000:\
#FF6C60:#A8FF60:#FFFFB6:\
#96CBFE:#FF73FE:#C6C5FE:#EEEEEE"
gnome-terminal

Here's how it looks

I use xterm from time to time as well, So I stick this in my .Xdefaults.

xterm*color0: #000000
xterm*color1: #FF6C60
xterm*color2: #A8FF60
xterm*color3: #FFFFCC
xterm*color4: #96CBFE
xterm*color5: #FF73FE
xterm*color6: #C6C5FE
xterm*color7: #EEEEEE
xterm*color8: #000000
xterm*color9: #FF6C60
xterm*color10: #A8FF60
xterm*color11: #FFFFB6
xterm*color12: #96CBFE
xterm*color13: #FF73FE
xterm*color14: #C6C5FE
xterm*color15: #EEEEEE
xterm

Here's what xterm looks like

“Why would you do all of this?” you may ask, If you’re like me and spend a considerable amount of time on the command line or editing code, it makes things alot lighter on the eyes and more readible.

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